NON-INTERVENTIONAL PROCEDURES

TENNIS ELBOW/ GOLFER’S ELBOW

In humans, the elbow joint is the synovial hinge joint between the humerus in the upper arm and the radius and ulna in the forearm which allows the hand to be moved towards and away from the body. The main task of the elbow is to properly place the hand in space by shortening and lengthening the upper limb.

‘Tennis elbow’ is a common term for a condition caused by overuse of the arm, forearm, and hand muscles that results in elbow pain. You don't have to play tennis to get this, but the term came into use because it can be a significant problem for some tennis players.

Tennis elbow is caused by either abrupt or subtle injury of the muscle and tendon area around the outside of the elbow. Tennis elbow specifically involves the area where the muscles and tendons of the forearm attach to the outside bony area (called the lateral epicondyle) of the elbow.

‘Golfer's elbow’, refers to the same process occurring on the inside of the elbow -- what your doctor may call medial epicondylitis. Overuse injury can also affect the back or posterior part of the elbow as well. Tennis elbow most commonly affects people in their dominant arm (that is, a right-handed person would experience pain in the right arm), but it can also occur in the non-dominant arm or both arms.

To treat this, the patient’s blood is taken and with the help of a special equipment, filtered to procure the plasma which is rich in healing cells called platelets. These plasma cells are then injected to the painful area. This is a day care procedure which does not require the patient to be admitted in the hospital in order to administer the injection.